Why Print Documents When You Can Print A Car?

Local Motors plan to print a 3D car in just 5 days

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© 2017 Local Motors

From their Rally Fighters to their Verrandos, local motors are known for their versatility. And now they’re making sure to live up to it, recently launching the world’s first 3D printed car competition. The specifications included designing a car with less that twenty parts which is heavily customizable. So whether you want one seat or seven, the car should be able to cater. Michael Anoé from Italy submitted the winning outline, and received $5000 as well as tickets to the International manufacturing Technology Show in Chicago where where in autumn, Local Motors plans to build a version of Anoé’s car in just FIVE days... It takes me longer than that to build a piece of Ikea furniture. Anoé’s ‘Strati’ design has strong character due to its unique varying angles and complex 3D surfacing (see below). Does it remind anyone else here of a Dune buggy?

The seats are also 3D printed and can be removied and customized. Judges described it as an "excellent balance between innovation, complexity (good 3D lines) and practicality (retractable roof)". Currently building its prototope in preparation for the big print, the car has a motor, battery and even stands on four wheels.

Although over 200 entrants applied, Anoé kept it ‘simple [but] with character’ and with ‘a nice style that really hangs together’. The company hopes that by eliminating the cost of parts, weight and labour, 3D printing will allow the manufacturing cars will become a lot cheaper, lighter and efficient.

Another design that garnered a lot of public attention is the ISF (Internal Strut Frame) whose structure is inspired by the bones of a bird's wing and uses vertical interior struts to provide a rigid structure while saving weight. And it looks pretty cool too.

This sporty 3D printed car design was created by Greg Thompson who, like the other runners up, received $1000 prize money. Some of the features of these cars will also be incorporated into the final product.