The Fashion Designer Who 3-D Prints Her Designs

Meet Noa Raviv, the designer who takes 3D printing to a whole new level

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© 2017 Noa Raviv

You often read about fashion designers who are 'inspired by construction, logic, geometry' - yet you would be pressed to find a collection that takes as literal an iteration of this as Noa Raviv's latest designs.

Raviv, 26, and from Tel Aviv has recently graduated from the Shenkar College of Design. Her graduate collection, Hard Copy, was created using a 3D rendering programme. Her final designs are the result of inputting 'impossible commands' into the programme, and seeing what it threw up, Raviv told Motherboard. Once she got a series of warped designs, she used a 3D printer to bring them to life. The final designs have been arranged together and stitched carefully by hand. 

Image: Noa Raviv

By way of an explanation for her process, Raviv told Motherboard, “I think in our world, sometimes things get mixed. You don’t always know what’s the copy and what’s the source...It’s often confusing, so I wanted to create this confusion between the 2D and 3D, and the real and the virtual." 

There is certainly something rather unsettling about this discord - our minds can't quite reconcile the clash of human against what is obviously computer-generated design.

 Image: Noa Raviv

Undoubtedly, Raviv has drawn inspiration from the pioneer of high fashion 3D printing, Dutch designer Pauline Van Dongen, who was the first designer to 3D print a shoe. These days Van Dongen's designs focus more on integrating technology into her clothes - her latest designs include a solar panneled dress that can charge your phone. 

Read: Wearable Wearables: High Fashion Meets High Tech

It's clear that this is only the beginning for the likes of Van Dongen and Raviv - the scope for 3D printing/integrated technology and fashion is huge - its only limitation is human imagination.

Image: Noa Raviv