4K Has A Downfall

This content protection software might ruin your TV

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Basically, the content protection software runs on TVs, receivers, gaming systems and video cards to ensure that users won’t steal the content, but the new version will require the user to have an HDCP 2.2 4K TV in order to use any HDCP 2.2-enabled device.

The most recent hardware encryption specification created by Intel is called HDCP, or High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection. Developed in 2001 to prevent pirated copying of media and its dissemination online, its now found on many major TV and video cards. Previous versions of HDCP, such as 2.1 and lower, protected content that was 1080 pixel resolution and under, but the new version means trouble for those customers that are using older hardware. The latest HDCP, 2.2, was developed towards 4K copyright protection.

Basically, the content protection software runs on TVs, receivers, gaming systems and video cards to ensure that users won’t steal the content, but the new version will require the user to have an HDCP 2.2 4K TV in order to use any HDCP 2.2-enabled device. So if you have an older 4K TV that only sports 2.1, you’ll have to buy a new 4K TV so as to use the latest Blu-ray players, stereo receivers and game consoles.

Most high-end TVs that were made in the last two years already sport HDCP 2.2, but if its less expensive or made before February 2013, its most likely the former version, 2.1. Regardless of your system, whether TV or monitor, if  you are attempting to watch 4K content in the future, you will eventually need to upgrade. In fact, it is entirely likely that soon streaming devices like the Amazon Fire TV and Roku 3 will also eventually require the new HDCP 2.2 as well. Currently, the only video cards that is compatible to 2.2 is the newly released Nividia GTX 960.