Well That Was Awkward

Some companies really just can't take a hint

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© 2017 Blackberry

This week CEO John Chen announced the BlackBerry Priv, an Android-powered slider smartphone.

BlackBerry, a brand that has already perfected awkwardness (no seriously, have you seen the design of these brick phones? 1997 called and wants it mobile back) has made headlines for itself this week by doing what it does best - being awkward.

Since March the company has been promising us (okay, actually just those that have any interest in the company at all… so, not a lot of people) that an Android-powered slider smartphone that will be available in October.

Chen seems really convinced that they have found a saving grace to the tanking company; calling it a “flagship slider device” even though that has literally not existed since T-Mobile’s 2006 SideKick, and even though they are not giving up on the BlackBerry 10 operating system - which apparently will get an update in March of next year.

And this week CEO John Chen made good on that promise this week when he announced the BlackBerry Priv. "Today, I am confirming our plans to launch Priv, an Android device named after BlackBerry’s heritage and core mission of protecting our customers’ privacy," wrote Chen. "Priv combines the best of BlackBerry security and productivity with the expansive mobile application ecosystem available on the Android platform."

Chen seems really convinced that they have found a saving grace to the tanking company; calling it a “flagship slider device” even though that has literally not existed since T-Mobile’s 2006 SideKick, and even though they are not giving up on the BlackBerry 10 operating system - which apparently will get an update in March of next year.

As if that wasn’t awkward enough, Chen gives an exclusive glimpse with the Priv in a video that must be one of the most awkward video of life. Chen is clearly confused by the device, its touch screen, and the fact that it is run by Android - not “Google” as he says in the video.

To be fair, though, all user Android experience would be through the individual apps installed through BlackBerry 10’s Android runtime layer. Apparently the device itself would still use the BlackBerry interface, gestures and interaction.

Still, you expect a CEO to have a better clue before going on air.

Lots of awkward turtle.