Sony Is Revolutionizing Cameras

Starting with the Sony RX1R II

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The new camera, Sony’s RX1R II is ridiculously expensive, but this fixed-lens beauty supports a full-frame image sensor.

This week Sony released an upgrade of one of its most beloved cameras: the Sony RX1. The new camera, Sony’s RX1R II is ridiculously expensive, but this fixed-lens beauty supports a full-frame image sensor.

The original RX1 and RX1R are actually hugely underrated camera accomplishments. This palm-sized cameras fit into your pocket, but both managed to pack a full-frame, Carl Zeiss Sonnar T 35mm f/2.0 lens into the tiny frame. The only difference between the two was seemingly, the low-pass filter, or the feature that gave a camera more or less resistance to moire and false color, which ensures perfect detail.

But now, the II has a brand new, and groundbreaking variable low-pass filtering function. Basically, Sony modified the low-pass filter so that it could be more resistant to moire, as well as a new reduced-strength filter that gathers even more detail, and it can also disable the effects of a low-pass filter altogether.

But now, the II has a brand new, and groundbreaking variable low-pass filtering function. Basically, Sony modified the low-pass filter so that it could be more resistant to moire, as well as a new reduced-strength filter that gathers even more detail, and it can also disable the effects of a low-pass filter altogether.

So for photographers that shoot far off landscapes and want to ensure they get every single detail, this is the camera for them. And for photographers that shoot objects with high-frequency detail, this variable low-pass filtering might just be revolutionary. Because for the photographers that shoot both, before the II, you needed both the RX1 and the RX1R, which didn’t come cheap.

Even though variable-low pass filtering is the main character, the Sony RX1R II got more than only one upgrade. The body is actually completely new, and a little bit thicker (2mm), and consequently it weighs a bit more than the RX1 (now scaling in at 9g). But in comparison to the RX1R, which weighs 25g, it is nothing. But with the slight weight increase, there is also some new and nifty features.

One of those features includes a new tilting LCD monitor and a built-in, pop-up viewfinder. Obviously the tilt is excellent for crowd shots, but not idea for selfie snapping (but let’s be honest, who selfie snaps with this camera?). As for the view-finder, it got a whole lot simpler and easier to use. It also comes with a new rubber eyecup that will shield unwanted light.

Obviously, the defining feature of the RX1 and RX1R was the Carl Zeiss 35mm lens with a f/2.0 aperture. Thankfully the RX1R II inherits this, with no new performance - which is just as well. It doesn’t need any.

So the performance is the same, but now it comes with a much better autofocus. Thankfully, it got about an upgrade of about 3x faster with the switch to Fast Hybrid AF system. Whereas the RX1 and RX1R were capable of 5 frames per second with the focus locked, the RX1R II can manage the same, but also while adjusting focus between the frames. That is a super sweet feature. Continuous autofocus is finally on the RX1-series.

The sensitivity range got better too, now up from ISO 100 to 25,600 to 50 to 102,400 equivalents.

The latest from Sony also has Wi-Fi connectivity, which means you can easily link up your Android, and less easily link up your Apple device.

It will hit shelves November 2015 with a price tag of $3,300.