The best 10 camera lenses in comparison

Which are the best camera lenses of 2020?

Best camera lenses of 2020 (1 - 5)
camera lens comparison
Comparison winner
camera lens comparison
Comparison winner
Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 Macro
Comparison winner
Canon EF 100mm F/2.8L Macro IS USM
Comparison winner
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 200mm F/2G ED VR II
Comparison winner
Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8L IS II USM
Comparison winner
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
Comparison winner
Nikon AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm F/2.8G IF-ED
Comparison winner
Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro
Comparison winner
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 400mm F/2.8G ED VR
Comparison winner
Canon EF 300mm F2.8L IS II USM
Comparison winner
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm F/2.8G ED VR II
Image
Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD 1:1 Macro
100points
Canon EF 100mm F/2.8L Macro IS USM
99points
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 200mm F/2G ED VR II
97points
Canon EF 70-200mm F/2.8L IS II USM
96points
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
96points
Nikon AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm F/2.8G IF-ED
96points
Sigma 105mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM Macro
95points
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 400mm F/2.8G ED VR
95points
Canon EF 300mm F2.8L IS II USM
94points
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 300mm F/2.8G ED VR II
94points
Best price
Best price
Summary
Summary
  • General info (83)
  • Optics (54)
  • Aperture (88)
  • Focus (100)
  • Benchmarks (81)
  • General info (84)
  • Optics (53)
  • Aperture (88)
  • Focus (100)
  • Benchmarks (76)
  • General info (89)
  • Optics (52)
  • Aperture (81)
  • Focus (79)
  • Benchmarks (87)
  • General info (83)
  • Optics (56)
  • Aperture (87)
  • Focus (99)
  • Benchmarks (83)
  • General info (83)
  • Optics (52)
  • Aperture (83)
  • Focus (60)
  • Benchmarks (97)
  • General info (72)
  • Optics (54)
  • Aperture (88)
  • Focus (100)
  • Benchmarks (78)
  • General info (83)
  • Optics (53)
  • Aperture (79)
  • Focus (100)
  • Benchmarks (79)
  • General info (86)
  • Optics (52)
  • Aperture (79)
  • Focus (98)
  • Benchmarks (85)
  • General info (59)
  • Optics (52)
  • Aperture (88)
  • Focus (99)
  • Benchmarks (90)
  • General info (79)
  • Optics (52)
  • Aperture (79)
  • Focus (99)
  • Benchmarks (87)
Pros
Pros
  • Shorter minimum focus distance
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Macro lens
  • Better magnification factor
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Shorter minimum focus distance
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Macro lens
  • Better magnification factor
  • Wider aperture at minimum focal length
  • Wider aperture at maximum focal length
  • More transmission
  • Higher DxOMark score
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Less chromatic aberration
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Greater zoom range
  • Wider maximum angle of view
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Higher sharpness result
  • Wider aperture at minimum focal length
  • Wider aperture at maximum focal length
  • More transmission
  • Higher DxOMark score
  • Shorter minimum focus distance
  • Shorter minimum focus distance
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Macro lens
  • Better magnification factor
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Less chromatic aberration
  • Shorter minimum focus distance
  • Shorter minimum focal length
  • Macro lens
  • Better magnification factor
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Higher DxOMark score
  • Longer maximum focal length
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Higher sharpness result
  • Less chromatic aberration
  • Higher DxOMark score
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
  • Less chromatic aberration
  • Narrower minimum angle of view
Cons
Cons
  • Maximum focal length
  • Chromatic aberration
  • Sharpness result
  • Maximum angle of view
  • DxOMark score
  • Sharpness result
  • Chromatic aberration
  • Maximum focal length
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Maximum focal length
  • Smallest aperture at maximum focal length
  • Minimum focus distance
  • Magnification
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Chromatic aberration
  • DxOMark score
  • Transmission
  • Distortion
  • Maximum focal length
  • Aperture blades
  • Distortion
  • Magnification
  • Maximum focal length
  • Smallest aperture at maximum focal length
  • Silent focus motor built into the lens
  • Focus motor
  • Sharpness result
  • Distortion
  • Chromatic aberration
  • Maximum focal length
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Weather-sealed (splashproof)
  • Maximum focal length
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Smallest aperture at maximum focal length
  • DxOMark score
  • Sharpness result
  • Transmission
  • Smallest aperture at maximum focal length
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Minimum focal length
  • Magnification
  • Minimum focus distance
  • Sharpness result
  • Magnification
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Minimum focus distance
  • Sharpness result
  • Smallest aperture at maximum focal length
  • Magnification
  • Maximum angle of view
  • Minimum focus distance
General info
Macro lensA macro lens is used to take very close-up photos, allowing you to capture flowers, insects etc. in great detail. A macro lens is any lens with 1:1 magnification.
Macro lensA macro lens is used to take very close-up photos, allowing you to capture flowers, insects etc. in great detail. A macro lens is any lens with 1:1 magnification.
Maximum focal lengthA longer maximum focal length allows you to focus in on a small part of a scene, and offers a narrower angle of view than shorter focal lengths.
Maximum focal lengthA longer maximum focal length allows you to focus in on a small part of a scene, and offers a narrower angle of view than shorter focal lengths.90mm100mm200mm200mm85mm105mm105mm400mm300mm300mm
Metal mountA metal mount is generally superior to a plastic mount as it is more durable.
Metal mountA metal mount is generally superior to a plastic mount as it is more durable.
Minimum focal lengthA shorter minimum focal length allows you to get more of the scene in the photo, and offers a wider angle of view than longer focal lengths.
Minimum focal lengthA shorter minimum focal length allows you to get more of the scene in the photo, and offers a wider angle of view than longer focal lengths.90mm0.3mm200mm70mm85mm105mm105mm400mm300mm300mm
Weather-sealed (splashproof)The device is protected with extra seals to prevent failures caused by dust, raindrops, and water splashes.
Weather-sealed (splashproof)The device is protected with extra seals to prevent failures caused by dust, raindrops, and water splashes.
Total score for "General info"
Total score for "General info"
Optics
MagnificationA true macro lens has a magnification of 1:1. This means that the image produced is a life-size representation of the subject being photographed.
MagnificationA true macro lens has a magnification of 1:1. This means that the image produced is a life-size representation of the subject being photographed.1x1x0.12x0.21x0.1x1x1x0.16x0.18x0.16x
Maximum angle of viewAt the shorter end of the lens you get the widest angle of view. This allows you to fit more of the scene into the photograph (based on APS-C format).
Maximum angle of viewAt the shorter end of the lens you get the widest angle of view. This allows you to fit more of the scene into the photograph (based on APS-C format).27°23.4°12.3°34°29°23°23.3°
Minimum angle of viewAt the longest end of the lens you get the narrowest angle of view. This allows you to fit a small portion of the scene into the photograph, such as when you are zooming in on a subject (based on APS-C format).
Minimum angle of viewAt the longest end of the lens you get the narrowest angle of view. This allows you to fit a small portion of the scene into the photograph, such as when you are zooming in on a subject (based on APS-C format).17°23.4°12°19°15°23.3°
Built-in optical image stabilizationOptical image stabilization uses gyroscopic sensors to detect the vibrations of the camera. The lens adjusts the optical path accordingly, ensuring that any type of motion blur is corrected before the sensor captures the image.
Built-in optical image stabilizationOptical image stabilization uses gyroscopic sensors to detect the vibrations of the camera. The lens adjusts the optical path accordingly, ensuring that any type of motion blur is corrected before the sensor captures the image.
Optical zoomThe zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. A higher zoom range means that the lens is more versatile.
Optical zoomThe zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. A higher zoom range means that the lens is more versatile.1x1x1x2.85x1x1x1x1x1x1x
Total score for "Optics"
Total score for "Optics"
Aperture
Widest aperture at maximum focal lengthWith a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.
Widest aperture at maximum focal lengthWith a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.2.8f2.8f2f2.8f1.4f2.8f2.8f2.8f2.8f2.8f
Wide aperture (main camera)With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.
Wide aperture (main camera)With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.f/2.80 f/2.80 f/2.00 f/2.80 f/1.40 f/2.80 f/2.80 f/2.80 f/2.80 f/2.80
Smallest aperture at maximum focal lengthA smaller aperture reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. This is important in bright conditions where a wider aperture could result in your image being overexposed. Another advantage is that with a smaller aperture you get a greater depth of field, and can keep all of the image in focus.
Smallest aperture at maximum focal lengthA smaller aperture reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. This is important in bright conditions where a wider aperture could result in your image being overexposed. Another advantage is that with a smaller aperture you get a greater depth of field, and can keep all of the image in focus.32f32f22f32f22f32f22f22f32f22f
Aperture bladesThe aperture controls how much light gets through to the camera’s sensor. More blades is often an indicator of a better quality lens. It also allows you to achieve much nicer looking bokeh when blurring out your background, whereas a lens with less blades will often produce harsher, more polygonal bokeh.
Aperture bladesThe aperture controls how much light gets through to the camera’s sensor. More blades is often an indicator of a better quality lens. It also allows you to achieve much nicer looking bokeh when blurring out your background, whereas a lens with less blades will often produce harsher, more polygonal bokeh.9998999999
Rounded aperture bladesSimilar to the number of aperture blades, rounded blades affect the way the light gets through to the sensor. Rounded blades, often only found on more expensive lenses, improve the appearance of the out-of-focus areas. This allows you to attain better, softer looking bokeh in your photos.
Rounded aperture bladesSimilar to the number of aperture blades, rounded blades affect the way the light gets through to the sensor. Rounded blades, often only found on more expensive lenses, improve the appearance of the out-of-focus areas. This allows you to attain better, softer looking bokeh in your photos.
Total score for "Aperture"
Total score for "Aperture"
Focus
Full-time manual focusWith full-time manual focus, you can move the focus ring whilst it is in AF (autofocus) mode. This means that you can make manual adjustments once the AF has finished, without changing to manual mode.
Full-time manual focusWith full-time manual focus, you can move the focus ring whilst it is in AF (autofocus) mode. This means that you can make manual adjustments once the AF has finished, without changing to manual mode.
Focus motorLenses with a built-in focus motor can autofocus even if the camera does not have its own focus motor.
Focus motorLenses with a built-in focus motor can autofocus even if the camera does not have its own focus motor.
Silent focus motor built into the lensLenses with built-in focus motor focus faster and more quietly than lenses without a focus motor which rely on the camera's body focus motor.
Silent focus motor built into the lensLenses with built-in focus motor focus faster and more quietly than lenses without a focus motor which rely on the camera's body focus motor.
Infinity focusMany lenses allow you to focus to infinity. This is essential when you wish to take photos including far off objects, such as when shooting landscapes, in order to make sure everything is sharp and in focus.
Infinity focusMany lenses allow you to focus to infinity. This is essential when you wish to take photos including far off objects, such as when shooting landscapes, in order to make sure everything is sharp and in focus.
Minimum focus distanceThis is the closest distance that the lens can focus. A shorter minimum focus distance allows you to get closer to your subject, and is particularly important when doing macro photography.
Minimum focus distanceThis is the closest distance that the lens can focus. A shorter minimum focus distance allows you to get closer to your subject, and is particularly important when doing macro photography.0.3m0.3m1.9m1.2m0.8m0.31m0.31m2.9m2m2.3m
Total score for "Focus"
Total score for "Focus"
Benchmarks
DxOMark scoreDxOMark is a set of tests to measure the performance and quality of lenses and cameras. The DxOMark score is the overall score given to the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
DxOMark scoreDxOMark is a set of tests to measure the performance and quality of lenses and cameras. The DxOMark score is the overall score given to the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.19182317331918212019
TransmissionThe transmission result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Transmission refers to the amount of light that reaches the sensor through all of the glass elements of a lens, with a lower TStop signifying more light. This is important as less light reaching the sensor can lead to the requirement of higher ISOs or slower shutter speeds. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
TransmissionThe transmission result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Transmission refers to the amount of light that reaches the sensor through all of the glass elements of a lens, with a lower TStop signifying more light. This is important as less light reaching the sensor can lead to the requirement of higher ISOs or slower shutter speeds. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.3.2TStop3.2TStop2.3TStop3.4TStop1.6TStop3.2TStop3.3TStop3.2TStop3.2TStop3.2TStop
Sharpness resultThe sharpness result from the DxOMark set of metrics. This result is based on the MTF (modulation transfer function) measurement, and gives an overall indication of the sharpness of images produced by the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
Sharpness resultThe sharpness result from the DxOMark set of metrics. This result is based on the MTF (modulation transfer function) measurement, and gives an overall indication of the sharpness of images produced by the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.9P-MPix11P-MPix11P-MPix12P-MPix16P-MPix9P-MPix10P-MPix11P-MPix14P-MPix11P-MPix
DistortionThe distortion result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Distortion in the lens refers to the variation of magnification throughout the image. More distortion will result in straight lines being recorded incorrectly in the image. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
DistortionThe distortion result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Distortion in the lens refers to the variation of magnification throughout the image. More distortion will result in straight lines being recorded incorrectly in the image. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.0%0%0%0.1%0.2%0.1%0.1%0%0%0%
Chromatic aberrationThe lateral chromatic aberration result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Chromatic aberration is a type of distortion which results in color fringing along edges within the image. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
Chromatic aberrationThe lateral chromatic aberration result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Chromatic aberration is a type of distortion which results in color fringing along edges within the image. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.6µm13µm9µm3µm4µm5µm3µm5µm3µm2µm
Total score for "Benchmarks"
Total score for "Benchmarks"

How to choose the best camera lens for your DSLR or mirrorless camera

It was only about a decade ago when people just barely started using digital cameras. While they did take some good quality photos at the time, consumers were always stuck with the same camera lens that came with the camera. It is not only the camera's sensor that dictates how well your photos turn out but also the camera's lens. It is nice to have a good camera, but it's even better to have a great camera lens.

Eventually, more advanced cameras came out, and these were bundled with interchangeable camera lenses. This allowed users to swap various types of camera lenses on DLSR or mirrorless cameras. Depending on the style of photography you want to pursue, whether it be long-distance shots or extreme close-ups, you will need a different type of camera lens.

Types of camera lenses

Before listing the different types of camera lenses you should consider, we want to initially talk about the key property used to classify these lenses – focal length. The focal length of a camera lens determines the magnification of the image. It is typically expressed in millimeters (mm). A higher focal length value means that you can zoom in on tiny objects and retain sharpness. On the other hand, a lower focal length value means that you will have a wider shot angle to capture very large objects in your frame. To make it easier, you can consider that the focal length determines the angle of view.

Camera lenses can be either of single focal length (e.g., 50 mm) or described by a focal length range (e.g., 24-80 mm). A lens with a single focal length is also known as a prime lens. However, a lens with a focal length range is known as a zoom lens. Zoom lenses can be classified into many types depending on the minimum and maximum focal length values, each serving different purposes.

Standard lens

The kit lens that comes bundled with your DSLR or interchangeable lens mirrorless camera is a perfect example of a standard zoom lens. Standard zoom lenses typically have a focal length range of 35-70 mm, while prime lenses typically have a fixed focal length of 50 mm. Using a standard lens will reproduce an image on your camera that approximately resembles what you see with your naked eye. This means that your photos will look very natural to you and everybody else because these lenses work the same way our eyes do.

As these lenses are standard, they are very versatile, being useful for a wide variety of photography situations. Whether it be street, documentary, landscape, or portrait photography, a standard lens can be used almost everywhere. If you are moving quickly and want to snap an exciting activity or if you are stationary and want to capture a still moment, then you will not go wrong with a standard camera lens.

Wide-angle lens

Wide-angle lenses have a typical focal length range of 21-35 mm. Some manufacturers produce wide-angle lenses with a focal length range of 10-24 mm, so you need to read the specifications in detail to know exactly what you are getting. At such a low focal length (below 24 mm), you can also call them ultra-wide-angle lenses. Using a wide-angle lens will result in a wide panoramic shot, great for landscape photography. In wide-angle photos, you will notice that the foreground is heavily emphasized and the background is pushed back, appearing distant.

Besides taking amazing and breathtaking photos of landscapes, wide-angle lenses are great for taking pictures of buildings and other types of behemoth architecture. They are also suitable for interior shots and for taking photos of a large group of people where you need to fit everybody into the frame. Good wide-angle lenses you can consider are listed here.

Telephoto lens

A telephoto lens has a focal length of over 70 mm. These lenses bring very distant objects closer, making them appear sharper than they would in a normal lens. A focal length range of 85-100 mm makes a medium telephoto lens. From 135-300 mm, you will have your standard telephoto lens. If you are looking for even more zoom, a focal length range of 400-800mm will give you a super-telephoto lens. Depending on your intended application, you should choose wisely. You can check out some of the best telephoto lenses here.

Due to their very narrow-angle of view, this makes telephoto lenses perfect for zooming in on objects. A telephoto lens will be perfect for focusing on specific details or on distant objects that caught your attention. These lenses are great for wildlife and sport situations where you cannot get close to the subject. They are also good for shooting portraits (particularly headshots) and landscapes where you want to capture the scale of an object. Some people also call them portrait lenses.

Fisheye lens

A fisheye lens is a type of wide-angle lens (below 24 mm) that is unique in how it captures photos. The edges of these photos are quite distorted, resulting in a hemispherical image with curved edges. That explains the name. The center of the picture is magnified and emphasized, and as you move away from the center and move toward the edges, objects will appear smaller. This type of lens is prevalent in underwater photography because the style of the pictures resembles what fishes see.

The eyes of a fish are on the sides of the head so it can see everything around. A fisheye lens gives you that same full panoramic view in a very artistic style. If you are looking to take photos of interior architecture and unique landscapes, purchase a fisheye lens.

Macro lens

When most of us take photos, we try to zoom in on something very far away. That is where your telephoto lens will come in handy. However, you might want to zoom in on something that is right in front of you, like flowers and little bugs and insects. That is when you need a macro lens, capable of reproducing images at a ratio of 1:1, even sometimes at a ratio of 1:2. This makes it great for extreme close-up photography. A macro lens has a typical focal length range of 40-200 mm.

Since the goal is to focus on very small objects that are right in front of you, the images produced by these lenses are quite sharp. This makes your photos intricately detailed. On our category page, you can find a wide selection of macro lenses.

Superzoom lens

We have seen many different types of lenses in this guide, ranging from the very long-range telephoto lenses that capture a faraway object to the ultra-wide-angle lenses that fit everything into a single frame. Now, if you are somebody who thinks it will be cumbersome to carry multiple lenses for different scenarios while you are traveling, then we have the perfect workaround just for you. You can opt for a superzoom lens.

A superzoom lens is an all-in-one lens that can do it all with its large focal range. A typical focal range for such a lens would be 18-200 mm, encompassing the entire spectrum. As it is a general-purpose lens, the image quality of photos suffers a bit, but you will make it up for the added convenience of only carrying a single camera lens.

Key lens properties

Now that we got the various types of camera lenses out of the way, we can talk about the main properties of lenses that you will find on many product specifications. Apart from the focal length, which ultimately categorizes the various types of lenses, you should pay attention to other features and properties of camera lenses. This is especially important if you want to use your camera in a particular scenario.

Aperture

If the focal length is the most important property of a camera lens, then its aperture is the second most important. It is a significant parameter describing the amount of light that can be gathered by the lens. Lenses with a larger maximum aperture can gather more light. Aperture can be expressed in a multitude of ways. For example, F5.6, f/5.6, and 1:5.6 all mean the same thing. Be careful, though. A smaller number means that the maximum aperture is higher, thereby gathering more light. Many people mix this up, and hopefully, after reading this guide, you will not fall into that trap. Here is an example. A large aperture would be f/32 and a small aperture would be f/1.4.

By having a lens with a larger maximum aperture, you can capture images in low-light conditions very well and take photos indoors without flash. Moreover, a larger maximum aperture will result in a shallower depth of field. This means that with a higher aperture rating, the central object in your photo will remain sharp and in focus while everything else will appear blurred. This might come in handy if you want to take creative shots.

Image stabilization

Whether you are a novice photographer or an experienced one, you want to buy a camera lens that has good image stabilization. It will make your life so much easier when the lens has a built-in technology to counteract the blur that may appear from shaky hands or unsteady shots. This is a problem that many people have. When a lens can help rectify the issue, make sure to buy it. Many manufacturers, such as Canon, Fujifilm, Nikon, Sony, Panasonic, and Samsung, use image stabilization systems within their lens and not their cameras. If you are buying a telephoto lens for long-distance shots, make sure you invest in image stabilization.

Optical zoom

The optical zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. When you use optical zoom to zoom in and out on objects, you are actually moving the lens to magnify the images. For example, for the Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3G ED VR, the optical zoom range is 16.7 (300/18). The average optical zoom range is 2.8.

Lens mount

A lens mount is proprietary technology manufacturers use to ensure that only their lenses can be attached to their cameras. That means that a Canon lens will only attach on a Canon camera body, a Panasonic lens will only fit on a Panasonic camera body, and so on. You cannot swap lenses across brands; you must buy a lens from the same manufacturer as your camera. Fortunately, Versus gives you the possibility to search for camera lenses by brand. If you look at the inner portion of a lens, you will see that no two brands are the same. However, there are some exceptions, such as Panasonic and Olympus using Four Thirds mounts on their DSLRs. This means that you can attach a Panasonic camera lens on an Olympus camera body, and vice versa.

There are also several third party manufacturers, like Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina, making lenses in a variety of mounts that can be attached to multiple cameras from other brands. Before you even buy a camera lens, please find out which mount your camera uses. Some examples of lens mount for DSLRs include the Nikon F-mount, Canon’s EF or EF-S, the Pentax K, and Sony’s Alpha A mount.

The table below lists the key manufacturers of lenses and their respective mount technologies.

Manufacturer

Interchangeable type name

Camera type

Mount type

 

Canon

EF mount

Still, movie

 

 

Bayonet

 

EF-S mount

Digital still

EF-M mount

Digital still, movie

Fujifilm X-series

Fujifilm X-mount

Digital still

Bayonet

 

Nikon

 

Nikon 1 mount

Digital still


Bayonet

Nikon F-mount

Still, industrial

Nikon Rangefinder

Nikon S-mount

Still

Bayonet


Olympus/Panasonic


Four Thirds


Digital still

Bayonet

OM-mount

Still

Micro Four Thirds

Digital still, camcorder

Pentax K

K-mount

Still

Bayonet

Samsung

NX-mount

Digital still

Bayonet

Sigma Corporation

YS Auto T-Thread

Still

Screw


Sony Alpha NEX


Sony E-mount


Digital still, movie

Bayonet


Tamron

T-mount

Still, industrial

Screw

Adaptall 1 & 2

Still

Bayonet

Tokina

T-thread

Still

Screw

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