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5 Alarming 3D Printed Guns

Is it safe for people to be able to print guns in their homes?

5 Alarming 3D Printed Guns

3D printing is a technology which is revolutionizing the way we produce goods. From cars, to houses, to organs of the body, almost anything and everything can be produced through 3D printing. The problem is, in a world where anybody can build almost anything, in very little time, the question becomes: what shouldn’t we allow people to print? Nowhere is this more pressing than on the topic of 3D printed guns. In the past year the maker community has created plans for a number of 3D printed weapons, some of which have even been tested. See our list of 5 of the most alarming of these guns below:

1. Liberator Pistol

The first ever 3D printable gun design, the Liberator Pistol was created by Cody Wilson of Defense Distributed. The single shot gun was produced, not to be an efficient weapon, but as a proof of concept which could trigger political action on the issue.

Image: © 2014 Wikipedia

2. Grizzly 2 Rifle

Improving on the concept of the Liberator, the Grizzly 2 was the first ever 3D printed rifle. Unlike the single shot pistol however, it was capable of multiple firings and greater range and accuracy.

3. Reprringer Pepperbox Revolver

Rather than designing a completely new weapon, the creator of the Reprringer revolver based their design on revolvers which were popular more than 150 years ago. This Pepper-box design was able to fire multiple shots unlike previous muzzle loading guns.

4. Zig Zag Revolver

Japanese lecturer Yoshimoto Imura designed and built the Zig Zag revolver based 3 historical pistols. While this gun only every fired blanks, it was enough to land Imura in prison in Japan for breaching firearms laws.

5. Imura Revolver

In the wake of the jailing of Imura, the maker community decided to carry on his work and build a new 3D printed gun, based off his design. Called the ‘Imura revolver, the gun functions as a 6 shot revolver and would be capable of sustained fire.

Image: © 2014 DEFCAD

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