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New App Lets Google Glass Read your Mind and Take Photos

Telekinetic Photography
Anne Parsons
New App Lets Google Glass Read your Mind and Take Photos © 2017 This Place

Recently there has been a lot of speculation about the possibility of Google Glass being used with wireless headsets that measure your brain waves (EEG). The idea is that these ‘brainwear’ devices, produced by companies such as Emotiv Lifesciences for consumer use, can translate their EEG data into commands.  

So it really comes as no surprise that this has come about. London start-up This Place has developed an app combining the smart glasses with an EEG headset, that lets you take a photograph through the power of your own mind.

This feat was possible through the app that uses MindRDR software, which monitors the concentration levels of the brain. When software detects an increase in concentration the user can move a white line upwards across the Google Glass screen. Once it reaches the top it takes a picture using Glass’s inbuilt camera.

Once the picture is taken, you can even post the picture to a social media profile by repeating the same process.

The usual way to take a picture with Google Glass is by issuing either voice command, or by tapping and swiping on the side of the device.

"We wanted to realise the true potential of Glass by allowing users to control it with their minds," Dusan Hamlin, chief executive of This Place told the BBC.

"Currently, users either have to touch it or use voice commands, which are restrictive for some social situations and for users with disabilities."

"Currently, users either have to touch it or use voice commands, which are restrictive for some social situations and for users with disabilities."

Indeed, what most people are getting excited about is the potentiality of such developments to help people with disabilities.

The firm's creative director Chloe Kirton told the BBC: "In the future, MindRDR could give those with conditions like locked-in syndrome, severe multiple sclerosis or quadriplegia the opportunity to interact with the wider world through wearable technology."

While Google itself is not endorsing the app,and will not be selling it in its Glass app store, their spokesperson did say that they are interested in hearing about new applications of Glass and that they have seen some great research in a variety of medical fields.

Related Story: Move Over Google Glass, It's Time For 'Brainwear'

 

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