Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
Top 7%113 points
Top 7%

Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*: 29 facts and highlights

1. Has full-time manual focus

With full-time manual focus you can move the focus ring whilst it is in AF (auto focus) mode. This means that you can make manual adjustments once the AF has finished, without changing to manual mode.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
61% have it

2. widest aperture at maximum focal length

With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.
1.4
Leica Summilux-TL 35 mm f/1.4 ASPH: 1.4

3. has or is a prime lens

A prime lens has a fixed focal length. In general, these are sharper, with a wider aperture.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
48% have it

4. minimum focus distance

This is the closest distance that the lens can focus. A shorter minimum focus distance allows you to get closer to your subject, and is particularly important when doing macro photography.
0.8m
Samsung NX 10mm F3.5 Fisheye: 0.09m

5. Can focus to infinity

Many lenses allow you to focus to infinity. This is essential when you wish to take photos including far off objects, such as when shooting landscapes, in order to make sure everything is sharp and in focus.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
62% have it

6. has built-in optical image stabilization

Optical image stabilization uses gyroscopic sensors to detect the vibrations of the camera. The lens adjusts the optical path accordingly, ensuring that any type of motion blur is corrected before the sensor captures the image.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
37% have it

7. Weather sealed

Device is protected with extra seals to prevent failures due to any kind of weather.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
29% have it

8. distortion

The distortion result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Distortion in the lens refers to the variation of magnification throughout the image. More distortion will result in straight lines being recorded incorrectly in the image. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
0.2%
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*: 0.2%

9. Has a metal mount

A metal mount is generally superior to a plastic mount as it is more durable.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
94% have it

10. Lens hood is reversible

The lens hood can screw onto the lens in reverse so that you can keep it on your camera at all times, ready to use.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
22% have it

11. Includes lens hood

It comes with a lens hood so that you don’t have to buy it separately. These are used to block strong light sources, such as the sun, from the lens to prevent glare and lens flare.
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*
57% have it

12. sharpness result

The sharpness result from the DxOMark set of metrics. This result is based on the MTF (modulation transfer function) measurement, and gives an overall indication of the sharpness of images produced by the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
16P-MPix
Zeiss Batis 25mm F2: 22P-MPix

13. transmission

The transmission result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Transmission refers to the amount of light that reaches the sensor through all of the glass elements of a lens, with a lower TStop signifying more light. This is important as less light reaching the sensor can lead to the requirement of higher ISOs or slower shutter speeds. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
1.6TStop
Sony 85mm F1.4 ZA Carl Zeiss Planar T*: 1.6TStop

14. DxOMark score

DxOMark is a set of tests to measure the performance and quality of lenses and cameras. The DxOMark score is the overall score given to the lens. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
33
Zeiss Batis 25mm F2: 39

15. vignetting

The vignetting result from the DxOMark set of metrics. Vignetting refers to when the brightness of an image changes from the center towards the edges, resulting in darkened corners. A result of 0 is perfect and the image will have no vignetting. Tested with Nikon D7000 or Canon 7D. Source: DxOMark.
-1.5
Nikon 1 Nikkor VR 10-100mm f/4.0-5.6: -0.6

16. aperture blades

The aperture controls how much light gets through to the camera’s sensor. More blades is often an indicator of a better quality lens. It also allows you to achieve much nicer looking bokeh when blurring out your background, whereas a lens with less blades will often produce harsher, more polygonal bokeh.
9
Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM: 11

17. minimum angle of view

At the longest end of the lens you get the narrowest angle of view. This allows you to fit a small portion of the scene into the photograph, such as when you are zooming in on a subject (based on APS-C format).
19°
Olympus M.Zuiko ED 75-300mm F4.8-6.7 II: 4.1°

18. maximum angle of view

At the shorter end of the lens you get the widest angle of view. This allows you to fit more of the scene into the photograph (based on APS-C format).
29°
Samyang 8mm F/2.8 UMC Fish-eye: 180°

19. optical zoom

The zoom range is the ratio between the longest and shortest focal lengths. A higher zoom range means that the lens is more versatile.
1x
Samsung NX 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 ED OIS: 11x

20. magnification

A true macro lens has a magnification of 1:1. This means that the image produced is a life-size representation of the subject being photographed.
0.1x
Leica Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-90mm F2.8-4 ASPH: 14x

21. minimum focal length

A shorter minimum focal length allows you to get more of the scene in the photo, and offers a wider angle of view than longer focal lengths.
85mm
Olympus M.Zuiko ED 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 EZ: 0.25mm

22. maximum focal length

A longer maximum focal length allows you to focus in on a small part of a scene, and offers a narrower angle of view than shorter focal lengths.
85mm
Olympus M.Zuiko ED 75-300mm F4.8-6.7 II: 300mm

23. smallest aperture at minimum focal length

A smaller aperture reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. This is important in bright conditions where a wider aperture could result in your image being overexposed. Another advantage is that with a smaller aperture you get a greater depth of field, and can keep all of the image in focus.
22
Sony E 18-200mm F3.5-5.6 OSS LE: 40

24. smallest aperture at maximum focal length

A smaller aperture reduces the amount of light reaching the sensor. This is important in bright conditions where a wider aperture could result in your image being overexposed. Another advantage is that with a smaller aperture you get a greater depth of field, and can keep all of the image in focus.
22
Sony E PZ 18-200mm F3.5-6.3 OSS: 40

25. widest aperture

With a wider aperture the sensor can capture more light, helping to avoid blur by enabling a faster shutter speed. It also provides a shallow depth of field, allowing you to blur the background to focus attention on the subject.
1.4f
Leica Summilux-TL 35 mm f/1.4 ASPH: 1.4f

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