The best 10 SSDs in comparison

DRAM cacheM.2NVMe
SSDs (1 - 5)
Western Digital WD Black SN850 2TBSabrent Rocket 4 Plus 4TBWestern Digital WD Black SN850 1TBCorsair MP600 Pro 2TBSamsung 980 Pro 2TBSamsung 980 Pro 1TBSabrent Rocket 4 Plus 2TBWestern Digital WD Black SN850 500GBSamsung 980 Pro 500GBAdata XPG Gammix S70 1TB
Image
Western Digital WD Black SN850 2TB
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus 4TB
Western Digital WD Black SN850 1TB
Corsair MP600 Pro 2TB
Samsung 980 Pro 2TB
Samsung 980 Pro 1TB
Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus 2TB
Western Digital WD Black SN850 500GB
Samsung 980 Pro 500GB
Adata XPG Gammix S70 1TB
Best price
Best price
Summary
Summary
  • Read speed (100)
  • Write speed (83)
  • Benchmarks (100)
  • General info (76)
  • Read speed (83)
  • Write speed (95)
  • Benchmarks (93)
  • General info (100)
  • Read speed (100)
  • Write speed (85)
  • Benchmarks (92)
  • General info (74)
  • Read speed (83)
  • Write speed (100)
  • Benchmarks (80)
  • General info (94)
  • Read speed (100)
  • Write speed (99)
  • Benchmarks (80)
  • General info (75)
  • Read speed (100)
  • Write speed (98)
  • Benchmarks (82)
  • General info (81)
  • Read speed (83)
  • Write speed (95)
  • Benchmarks (76)
  • General info (93)
  • Read speed (90)
  • Write speed (67)
  • Benchmarks (96)
  • General info (73)
  • Read speed (89)
  • Write speed (98)
  • Benchmarks (80)
  • General info (81)
  • Read speed (85)
  • Write speed (95)
  • Benchmarks (70)
  • General info (92)
Read speed
Sequential read speedThis is the maximum sequential read speed according to the manufacturer. High sequential read speeds are most useful when the system is reading very large files (such as videos) from the SSD.
Sequential read speedThis is the maximum sequential read speed according to the manufacturer. High sequential read speeds are most useful when the system is reading very large files (such as videos) from the SSD.7000MB/s
7100MB/s
7000MB/s
7000MB/s
7000MB/s
7000MB/s
7100MB/s
7000MB/s
6900MB/s
7400MB/s
Random read speedThis is the maximum random read speed according to the manufacturer. It is measured in IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) and is a good indication of the read performance of the SSD in day-to-day usage.
Random read speedThis is the maximum random read speed according to the manufacturer. It is measured in IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) and is a good indication of the read performance of the SSD in day-to-day usage.1000000IOPS
650000IOPS
1000000IOPS
660000IOPS
1000000IOPS
1000000IOPS
650000IOPS
800000IOPS
800000IOPS
650000IOPS
Total score for "Read speed"
Total score for "Read speed"
Write speed
Sequential write speedThis is the maximum sequential write speed according to the manufacturer. High sequential write speeds are most useful when the system is writing very large files (such as videos) to the SSD.
Sequential write speedThis is the maximum sequential write speed according to the manufacturer. High sequential write speeds are most useful when the system is writing very large files (such as videos) to the SSD.5100MB/s
6600MB/s
5300MB/s
6550MB/s
5100MB/s
5000MB/s
6600MB/s
4100MB/s
5000MB/s
6400MB/s
Random write speedThis is the maximum random write speed according to the manufacturer. It is measured in IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) and is a good indication of the write performance of the SSD in day-to-day usage.
Random write speedThis is the maximum random write speed according to the manufacturer. It is measured in IOPS (Input/Output Operations Per Second) and is a good indication of the write performance of the SSD in day-to-day usage.710000IOPS
700000IOPS
720000IOPS
800000IOPS
1000000IOPS
1000000IOPS
700000IOPS
570000IOPS
1000000IOPS
740000IOPS
Total score for "Write speed"
Total score for "Write speed"
Benchmarks
PassMark resultThe PassMark benchmark measures the overall performance of the SSD based on read speeds, write speeds, and seek times. The value given is an average based on user-submitted results.
PassMark resultThe PassMark benchmark measures the overall performance of the SSD based on read speeds, write speeds, and seek times. The value given is an average based on user-submitted results.39950
N.A.38692
N.A.32384
33329
N.A.38781
30784
24832
Random read speed (UserBenchmark)The random read speed benchmark gives an indication of the everyday performance of the SSD. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.
Random read speed (UserBenchmark)The random read speed benchmark gives an indication of the everyday performance of the SSD. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.66.2MB/s
58.8MB/s
73.4MB/s
53.3MB/s
69MB/s
72.1MB/s
53MB/s
72.1MB/s
70.2MB/s
52.8MB/s
Sequential read speed (UserBenchmark)The sequential read speed benchmark gives an indication of the SSD performance when reading large files. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.
Sequential read speed (UserBenchmark)The sequential read speed benchmark gives an indication of the SSD performance when reading large files. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.3420MB/s
2433MB/s
3061MB/s
1997MB/s
2588MB/s
2714MB/s
1862MB/s
3323MB/s
2701MB/s
1614MB/s
Random write speed (UserBenchmark)The random write speed benchmark gives an indication of the everyday performance of the SSD. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.
Random write speed (UserBenchmark)The random write speed benchmark gives an indication of the everyday performance of the SSD. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.198MB/s
227MB/s
187MB/s
202MB/s
155MB/s
158MB/s
196MB/s
190MB/s
161MB/s
186MB/s
Sequential write speed (UserBenchmark)The sequential write speed benchmark gives an indication of the SSD performance when writing large files. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.
Sequential write speed (UserBenchmark)The sequential write speed benchmark gives an indication of the SSD performance when writing large files. The value given here is the average result calculated from user-submitted scores. Source: UserBenchmark.3640MB/s
4474MB/s
2868MB/s
3884MB/s
2803MB/s
2857MB/s
3528MB/s
3298MB/s
2712MB/s
3001MB/s
Total score for "Benchmarks"
Total score for "Benchmarks"
General info
Bits of encryption supportedAES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption is a widely used method to secure data. There are three levels of encryption (128, 192 and 256) with 256-bit being the strongest.
Bits of encryption supportedAES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption is a widely used method to secure data. There are three levels of encryption (128, 192 and 256) with 256-bit being the strongest.256
256
256
256
256
256
256
256
256
256
Internal storageThe internal storage refers to the built-in storage space available in a device for system data, apps, and user-generated data. With a large amount of internal storage, you can save more files and apps on your device.
Internal storageThe internal storage refers to the built-in storage space available in a device for system data, apps, and user-generated data. With a large amount of internal storage, you can save more files and apps on your device.2000GB
4000GB
1000GB
2000GB
2000GB
1000GB
2000GB
500GB
500GB
1000GB
Maximum operating temperatureThe maximum temperature at which the device can perform to the optimal level.
Maximum operating temperatureThe maximum temperature at which the device can perform to the optimal level.70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
70°C
MTBFMTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) is the manufacturer’s estimation of the average time for a device to fail.
MTBFMTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) is the manufacturer’s estimation of the average time for a device to fail.1.75million hours
1.6million hours
1.75million hours
1.7million hours
1.5million hours
1.5million hours
1.6million hours
1.75million hours
1.5million hours
2million hours
SSD storage typeThe storage type determines how many bits of data are written to each memory cell. These storage types include SLC (one bit per cell), MLC (two bits per cell), and TLC (three bits per cell). The less bits that are written to each cell, the greater the speed and reliability.
SSD storage typeThe storage type determines how many bits of data are written to each memory cell. These storage types include SLC (one bit per cell), MLC (two bits per cell), and TLC (three bits per cell). The less bits that are written to each cell, the greater the speed and reliability.3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Total score for "General info"
Total score for "General info"

How to choose the best SSD

Are you buying a new PC or upgrading an old one? You might want to consider a computer with a solid-state drive instead of an old-school hard disk drive. Solid-state drives (SSDs) are faster, more durable, and more reliable compared to hard disk drives (HDDs).

There are countless options available on the market, and even if you go for the leading SSD manufacturers, like Samsung, Western Digital, or Crucial, you might get confused between their different product lines.

To help you decide, we have compiled a list with the most important specifications you should take into account when choosing an SSD.

SSD vs. HDD

When it comes to data storage, HDDs and SDDs work differently. HDDs store the data on spinning platters, with a needle-like component called head floating above it. Whenever we need to access data, the head moves to the position of the data. In the case of SSD, there are no moving parts. Data is stored in memory blocks. So there is no question of mechanical failures in SSDs. The most significant advantage of SSD over HDD is performance. If you are looking for a way to make your computer operate fast and efficiently, SSDs are the best bet for you.

But there are a few downsides to SSDs as well. Even though over the years, their price has dropped, they are still quite expensive. You have to spend about $100 to get a 250GB SSD, whereas the same price can get you a 4TB HDD.

Performance and speed

When it comes to measuring the performance of an SSD, there are three key aspects to consider: throughput, latency, and IOPS (Input/Output Operations per Second).

Throughput, the actual data transfer rate, is the second parameter to measure the performance of a storage device. How long it takes to BEGIN a data transfer, called latency, is even more important. IOPS indicates how OFTEN the storage device can perform a data transfer. IOPS and latency are integral performance measuring tools for enterprise and data center.

Another crucial parameter is the Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF), which is the predicted elapsed time between inherent failures of a system during operation. For example, in the case of the Intel 335, the 1.2 million hour MTBF means that if the drive is used at an average of 8 hours a day, a population of 1000 SSDs would be expected to have one failure every 150 days. The MTBF varies from manufacturer to manufacturer but, generally, any device with a value above 1 million is good to go.

Interface and form factors

SATA, mSATA, M.2, and PCIe are the most popular interface options currently available on the market. The form factor depends not only on the type of interface used but also on the physical dimensions of your device.

SATA

At present, the SSD market is dominated by various types of Serial ATA interfaces. With the latest version of SATA, the data exchange rate can go as high as 6Gbps. But not all SSDs are using the latest SATA III interface. The data transfer rates of different versions of SATA interface are presented below:

To get the promised speed, you need to ensure that your computer is SATA III compatible as well. However, even if your computer is not compatible with SATA III, the SSD would still work because all versions of SATA are backward-compatible. However, in such a situation, the data transfer rate is limited.

The form factor of SATA SSDs is pretty much similar to that of HDDs. They usually come with standardized options of 3.5 inches, 2.5 inches, and 1.8 inches. For laptops, the standard form factor is 2.5 inches, and for desktop, it's 3.5 inches, but you can mount a 2.5 inch SSD on a PC using an adaptor. Smaller form factors are suitable for laptops. When buying an SSD for your laptop, also keep an eye for the thickness. The thickness may vary from 5mm to 9.5mm, but some can be as thick as 12mm, and they might not fit.

mSATA

mSATA or mini-SATA interface is identical to SATA in terms of data transfer rate. The smaller form factor of mSATA SSDs makes them ideal for notebooks and laptops. However, the mSATA interface is getting replaced by the M.2 interface.

PCIe

Peripheral Component Interconnect Express or PCIe SSDs use the PCIe slots on the motherboard and are thus capable of high performance. Theoretically, in the PCIe SSDs, transfer rate results can hover anywhere from 1.5GB/s to 3GB/s. The downside is that these SSDs are very expensive. The form factor of PCIe SSDs varies from 4.3 inches to 12.3 inches.

M.2

M.2 is an interface that can use either SATA specification and restrict the bandwidth up to 600MB/s or can use PCIe that provides bandwidth up to 1 Gbps. There is also the possibility to use multiple PCIe lanes (up to 4 PCIe lanes) to get transfer rates of up to 4 Gbps. They have a light and thin chassis and are suitable for portable devices.

Protocols

With different hardware interface specifications like PCIe, we have been able to boost the data transfer rate. But to get full advantage of the hardware, it is crucial to have efficient software protocols specifically optimized for SSDs.

AHCI (Advanced Host Controller Interface) was the protocol used for the storage devices, but it was more optimized for HDDs. NVMe or Non-Volatile Memory Express protocol was developed for low-latency SSDs, paired with an interface like PCIe. Other protocols, such as SATA Express (by Serial ATA International Organization) and SCSI Express, are also used to boost the performance of SSDs using PCIe interfaces.

Security

To secure data, consumer and enterprise SSDs are using hardware-based encryption. On these SSDs, data is always secured with the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). Nowadays, most SSDs come with 128-bit, 192-bit, or 256-bit AES to secure the data. But your platform should support AES x-bit self-encryption. The advantage of a self-encrypting drive is that it takes place at the BIOS level.

Storage capacity

Typical storage capacities for solid-state drives range between 64GB and 1TB. The number of NAND chips (memory chips) also affects the performance of the SSD. Usually, the higher the storage, the more NAND chips the SSD has. A higher number of memory chips allows the drive to spread out the read and write operations of the data between the chips, effectively increasing performance, a process similar to how RAID works on a computer with multiple hard drives.

The best bet is to use anything beyond 250GB, as it gives you enough space to keep your operating system, games, and other applications. There is also the possibility of using both an SSD and an HDD. Usually, for systems that use both types of data storage, the SSD is used as the boot drive, which has the operating system (because it's faster), and the HDD is used to store files.

In the case of HDDs, when the operating system needs extra space, it overwrites the "not in use" memory zone (the memory available after deleting a file) in one single operation. But a solid-state drive has to first erase all data in this "not in use" space before recording the new data. SSDs are only able to delete data in large 512 kB blocks, which slows down the entire overwriting process. However, new SSDs support TRIM. Whenever you delete a file, the operating system sends a TRIM command to mark the unused data blocks, informing the SSD about which blocks of data are no longer in use. That way, the SSD can write data on the marked space, skipping the cumbersome deletion process.

By Arnab Shome
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